Category: Science and Medicine

Cosgrove-Cleveland

Cleveland Clinic Fully Embraces Pseudoscience

A recent and embarrassing anti-vaccine screed from the Director of the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Center produced a media backlash. Toby Cosgrove, CEO and President of the Cleveland Clinic, had the opportunity to re-dedicate his organization to good science and medical practice. Instead he doubled-down on the Cleveland Clinic's embrace of quackademic medicine and pseudoscience.

/ January 18, 2017
https://www.flickr.com/photos/euromagic/2351628831/

Peanut Allergy Prevention Advice Does a 180

New guidelines suggest that preventing peanut allergies may be as simple as giving peanut-containing food, beginning in infancy. How did old guidelines, which recommended avoidance, get it so wrong?

/ January 12, 2017
Without regular chiropractic care, this child may die in the next 80 to 90 years!

Newborn Chiropractic, False Balance, and The Doctors

The vacuous TV docs on The Doctors have demonstrated once again why the show is a highly unreliable source for medical information of any sort.

/ December 30, 2016
Ambrosia sp.	Ragweed pollen, EM

Fake treatments for real diseases: A review of allergy and asthma advertisements by naturopaths, chiropractors, homeopaths and acupuncturists

A majority of Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, homeopathic and acupuncture clinics claim that they can diagnose or treat allergies, sensitivities and asthma.

/ December 29, 2016
This is a panel showing some of the pathologic criteria for distinguishing invasive encapsulated follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma from noninvasive. This is real science. Sayer Ji's rant is not.

Support Science-Based Medicine

2016 has been a tough year for reason, science, medicine, and facts. Help Science-Based Medicine make 2017 a better one.

/ December 21, 2016
A young child opening a CAMCrate for Kids! box, hoping for relief from her Childhood-Onset Qi Deficiency (COQD)

Cleveland Clinic Subscription Box Service Introduces Integrative Medicine to Curious Consumers

Cleveland, OH- Cleveland native Kelly Anderson is looking forward to the end of the month like a young child anxiously awaiting Christmas morning. That’s because on a day between the 20th and the 28th of December, she will receive the gift of hope. Anderson, a 43-year-old mother of five who was diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease and numerous nutritional imbalances earlier this...

/ December 2, 2016
ivf_science

Add-on Services for IVF – The Evidence

In vitro fertilization (IVF) is the only option for many couples who want to have their own genetic child. This is an expensive procedure – it can cost up to $20,000 per attempt, with about a 40% success rate overall. Couples going for IVF are often desperate to have their own child, and the uncertainty of success can be emotionally and financially...

/ November 30, 2016
functionalmedicine12

“Functional medicine” in practice

I’ve frequently written about a form of medicine often practiced by those who bill themselves as practicing “complementary and alternative medicine” (CAM) or “integrative medicine” (or, as I like to refer to it, “integrating” quackery with medicine). I’m referring to something called “functional medicine” or, sometimes, “functional wellness,” which Wally Sampson first introduced to readers of this blog way back in 2008,...

/ November 28, 2016
Ball-and-stick diagram of the phenibut molecule

Phenibut Is Neither Proven Nor Safe As A Prosocial Wonder Drug

Editor’s note: With Mark Crislip away on yet another vacation, we present an inaugural guest post from Abby Campbell, a practicing MD, Ph.D and contributor at HealthyButSmart.com. Welcome Abby! On average for the past year, phenibut has been typed into google 49,500 times a month. Phenibut is a supposed wonder drug that claims to promote sociability and lessen anxiety. When people run...

/ November 25, 2016
coughkid

Homeopathic Syrup for the Treatment of Pediatric Colds: Randomized Controlled Nonsense is Still Nonsense

According to the authors of the latest study claiming to demonstrate effectiveness of homeopathic remedies, colds are common in the pediatric population. They further explain that colds and cough symptoms are a frequent impetus for parents to seek pediatric medical care. Finally, they add that evidence in support of decongestants, antihistamines and cough suppressants for the treatment of pediatric cold symptoms is...

/ November 18, 2016