Category: Science and Medicine

The Primum non nocere principle in psychotherapy: A science based approach

Is the principle of primum non nocere, to do no harm, applied by psychotherapists?

/ July 26, 2018

Bad Faith: When conspiracy theorists play academics and the media for fools

Does a recent study of changes in brain cancer rates indicate we should fear our cell phones? Or does the problem lie elsewhere?

/ July 16, 2018

What’s the Truth behind The Truth About Pet Cancer?

The Truth About Pet Cancer (TAPC) is a slick bit of propaganda. Although it contains some interesting, even promising ideas, these are unfortunately served with a heavy seasoning of misinformation and fear-mongering. Hypotheses and opinions are presented as established facts, and anyone who disagrees is suggested to be ignorant at best, venal and corrupt at worst.

/ July 13, 2018

Supplements for Osteoarthritis – Evaluating the Evidence

A new review evaluates the evidence for supplements to treat osteoarthris

/ July 12, 2018

Alternative Flea Control Products

Every natural pet health website has their recommendations for flea treatments that don’t use harsh chemicals. The evidence for their claims is nonexistent. It’s appropriate that they’re talking about parasitic organisms, but I don’t think they see the irony.

/ July 6, 2018

Rise of the Miscellany of Medical Malarkey…Again

More deaths in the European measles outbreak. Experts call for a national registry of sleep-related deaths in infants. Raw milk puts several Tennessee children in the intensive care unit. Oh, and medicinal dog urine. It must be time for another miscellany of medical malarkey.

/ June 29, 2018

Vitamin D and the relationship to colon cancer

Colorectal cancer is common. A new study examines the relationship with vitamin D levels.

/ June 28, 2018

Halotherapy – The Latest Spa Pseudoscience

Halotherapy, sitting in a salt room, is the latest spa trend, just as full of pseudoscience and false claims as we have come to expect from wellness spas.

/ June 13, 2018
Microscope

Science-based medicine versus other ways of knowing

It has been our position that science is the most effective means of determining medical treatments that work and whose benefits outweigh their risks. Those who promote pseudoscientific or prescientific medicine, however, frequently appeal to other ways of knowing, often ancient knowledge from other cultures and pointing out deficiencies in SBM to justify promoting their treatments. Do their justifications hold water?

/ June 11, 2018

Is Firing Vaccine-Hesitant Families Unfair? Definitely…I think.

Is the dismissal of vaccine-hesitant families from a pediatric practice unethical? Could it be unfair to other pediatric healthcare providers and increase risk to the community? Three medical ethicists who wrote a recent JAMA Pediatrics opinion piece believe so.

/ June 1, 2018