All posts by Clay Jones

Clay Jones, M.D. is a pediatrician and a regular contributor to the Science-Based Medicine blog. He primarily cares for healthy newborns and hospitalized children, and devotes his full time to educating pediatric residents and medical students. Dr. Jones first became aware of and interested in the incursion of pseudoscience into his chosen profession while completing his pediatric residency at Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital a decade ago. He has since focused his efforts on teaching the application of critical thinking and scientific skepticism to the practice of pediatric medicine. Dr. Jones has no conflicts of interest to disclose and no ties to the pharmaceutical industry. He can be found on Twitter as @SBMPediatrics and is the co-host of The Prism Podcast with fellow SBM contributor Grant Ritchey. The comments expressed by Dr. Jones are his own and do not represent the views or opinions of Newton-Wellesley Hospital or its administration.

From the Vault: Newborn Vitamin K Shots Save Baby Lives

I've gone into the vault in order to save new content until after technical difficulties have been ironed out. Here is one of my earliest and most memorable (to me) posts on the newborn vitamin K shot and risks of refusing it.

/ November 15, 2019

Tattoos Won’t Boost Your Immune System

Can getting a tattoo help reduce your risk of catching a cold? What about getting a bunch of 'em? Sadly, no amount of ink is going to boost your immune system.

/ October 18, 2019

Vaccines in the News: The Good, the Bad, and the Imminent Loss of Our Measles Elimination Status

A quick recap of vaccine-related news from over the past several weeks.

/ October 4, 2019

The Verdict is In: There is No Justice for Ezekiel Stephan

Ezekiel Stephan died from bacterial meningitis and his parents' failure to seek appropriate medical care in 2012, and now they have been acquitted after the Supreme Court of Canada ordered a new trial. It appears that there may be no justice for Ezekiel.

/ September 20, 2019

A British Teenager is Blind, But Not Because of Junk Food or “Fussy Eating”

A recent case report about a British teenager blinded by severe nutritional deficiencies resulted in widespread media coverage, much of which missed the point. He wasn't blinded by junk food and he wasn't just a fussy eater.

/ September 6, 2019

Science-Based Satire: Children of Anti-Vaccine Parents More Likely to Refuse Cootie Shot

Are the children of anti-vaccine parents refusing their cootie shots? Are we at risk of seeing outbreaks in our schools? They do say that the organic, non-GMO apples don't fall far from the tree. No, this is satire. Everyone knows that the cootie virus can only be found in government research laboratories.

/ August 23, 2019

Put it Over There with the Others: More “Promising Preliminary” Evidence for Acupressure

Another day, another legitimate journal publishing a preliminary study practically designed to spit out a positive result. Also, acupuncture robots?

/ August 9, 2019

Think Twice Before Giving Young Children Reflux Medications

A recent study demonstrates an association between reflux medications in infancy and increased risk of fractures in early childhood, yet another reason to be cautious when using pharmaceutical interventions to manage a mostly benign and self-limited condition.

/ July 26, 2019

A Canadian Journalist Calls Out Pediatric Chiropractic Again, and the Canadian Chiropractic Association Responds…Again

The National Post has published another quality article pointing out the absurdity of infant chiropractic care. The Canadian Chiropractic Association's attempt at a rebuttal falls flat.

/ July 12, 2019

No. “Big Data” Does Not Support Chiropractic Care for Infants

A new study claims to have used "big data" to help answer the question of infant chiropractic effectiveness, but it's just another collection of anecdotes that adds nothing to our understanding of infant medicine.

/ June 28, 2019