All posts by Steven Novella

Founder and currently Executive Editor of Science-Based Medicine Steven Novella, MD is an academic clinical neurologist at the Yale University School of Medicine. He is also the president and co-founder of the New England Skeptical Society, the host and producer of the popular weekly science podcast, The Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe, and the author of the NeuroLogicaBlog, a daily blog that covers news and issues in neuroscience, but also general science, scientific skepticism, philosophy of science, critical thinking, and the intersection of science with the media and society. Dr. Novella also contributes every Sunday to The Rogues Gallery, the official blog of the SGU.

New Study Finds that Statins Prevent Cardiovascular Deaths

A new meta-analysis shows that statin drugs are effective at preventing cardiovascular events and death, especially in patients with a baseline LDL cholesterol >100.

/ April 18, 2018

Adding Sensation to Robotic Limbs

Recently scientists have managed to stimulate the brain in such a way that approximated some of the sensations of a natural limb in a paralyzed subject. No, they did not regain sensation, but the research is a powerful proof of concept. It shows that it is possible to produce natural-feeling sensation through electrical stimulation of the cortex, an important step for brain-machine...

/ April 11, 2018

The Pertussis Resurgence

A new analysis shows that the resurgence of pertussis is largely due historical patterns of vaccination. This and other data show the importance of full vaccine compliance in preventing returning epidemics of this deadly disease.

/ April 4, 2018

Augmented Reality in Medicine

Augmented reality has the potential to revolutionize how physicians access data while caring for patients, whether in the operating room or clinic.

/ March 28, 2018

Music for ADHD?

In a recent "Ask Me Anything" on Reddit, the CEO of Brain.fm claimed his company's music can improve concentration and help with ADHD. At the very least I see such claims as highly implausible, and not something we can conclude from the existing basic science research. I have no problem with doing clinical research, and maybe we might learn something about how...

/ March 21, 2018

Facilitated Communication Rears Its Ugly Head Again

Facilitated communication is pure pseudoscience that was debunked almost 30 years ago, but it keeps coming back, creating new victims.

/ March 14, 2018

Too Many Too Soon? No!

The results of a study looking at, in part, the "too many, too soon" complaints of antivaccination activists were completely negative. There was no difference in vaccine antigen exposure between two groups who differed in the number of infections over a two year period. Therefore there is no correlation between vaccine antigen exposure and susceptibility to other infections.

/ March 7, 2018

Where Are We With the Replication “Crisis”

The replication problem is not as bad as the sensational reporting has suggested. But it is still a legitimate issue that needs to be addressed. 

/ February 28, 2018

Gun Violence as a Public Health Issue

Gun violence is a serious public health issue in America but is not getting the research that it deserves. This needs to change.

/ February 21, 2018

Move

For most people, common health goals are best approached with as simple a strategy as possible. This avoids cognitive overload and non-compliance. Get the basics right, as there are diminishing returns from increasingly arcane details.

/ February 14, 2018