Tag: alternative medicine

New York Times Goop Fail

A NYT opinion piece repeats all the common alternative medicine tropes in service to the further exploitation of women.

/ February 5, 2020
coronavirus

Alternative Medicine Exploits Coronavirus Fears

Alternative medicine has been quick to capitalize on the public's fear of coronavirus. They offer an array of bogus treatments.

/ February 4, 2020

Professor Gives Grades to Alternative Medicine

Edzard Ernst assigns a grade to 150 alternative medicine modalities, evaluating plausibility, efficacy, safety, cost, and risk/benefit balance. A very useful reference.

/ September 17, 2019

Shaping Opinions About Science and Medicine

Responding to a commentary with all the usual anti-science tropes.

/ July 24, 2019

The NORI protocol: An unproven fruit-based nutritional treatment for cancer sold by a self-proclaimed “expert”

Mark Simon is the founder of the Nutritional Oncology Research Institute. He doesn't have an MD, DO, nor PhD. (He doesn't even have an ND!) Yet he claims to have discovered a dietary protocol that can cure cancer. Can it? (I think you know the answer to this question.)

/ May 13, 2019

The Magic Feather Effect: Placebos and the Power of Belief in Alternative Medicine

In her book The Magic Feather Effect, journalist Melanie Warner covers placebo research, shows that alternative medicine is placebo medicine, takes a "try it yourself" approach, and gives belief and anecdotes more credit than they deserve.

/ February 19, 2019

A whole issue of JACM devoted to “integrative oncology” propaganda? Oh, goody.

Last week, The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine published a Special Focus Issue on "integrative oncology." In reality, it's propaganda that promotes pseudoscience and the "integration" of quackery into oncology.

/ October 1, 2018
Crowdfunding

Crowdfunding: The fuel for cancer quackery

Ever since I first started taking notice about cancer quacks like Stanislaw Burzynski, I noticed how crowdfunding using social media and sites like GoFundMe appear to be an integral part of the business model of quack clinics. Thanks to an investigation by The Good Thinking Society published in BMJ last week, I now have a feel for the scope of the problem....

/ September 17, 2018

Integrative Medicine finally admits it’s attracting bad apples

Integrative medicine proponents finally acknowledge their field is attracting bad apples but fail to identify the real source of their problem: It's rejection of science-based medicine, not lack of training in integrative medicine.

/ September 13, 2018

How We Believe

James Alcock's new book about belief is a masterpiece that explains how our minds work, how we form beliefs, and why they are so powerful. It amounts to a course in psychology and an owner's manual for the brain.

/ June 26, 2018