All posts by Harriet Hall

Harriet Hall, MD also known as The SkepDoc, is a retired family physician who writes about pseudoscience and questionable medical practices. She received her BA and MD from the University of Washington, did her internship in the Air Force (the second female ever to do so),  and was the first female graduate of the Air Force family practice residency at Eglin Air Force Base. During a long career as an Air Force physician, she held various positions from flight surgeon to DBMS (Director of Base Medical Services) and did everything from delivering babies to taking the controls of a B-52. She retired with the rank of Colonel.  In 2008 she published her memoirs, Women Aren't Supposed to Fly.

Supplements with Multiple Ingredients, Many with No Apparent Rationale

Dietary. supplements frequently have multiple ingredients, often mixtures of vitamins, minerals, and herbs. The rationale for including each ingredient is questionable, to say the least.

/ December 10, 2019

Alternative Medicine: Placebos for Pets

A skeptical veterinarian reviews the evidence for alternative medicine for pets, and concludes it's mostly placebos.

/ December 3, 2019

SeroVital: Dubious Anti-Aging Claims

SeroVital is marketed as an anti-aging remedy that works by raising human growth hormone (HGH) levels naturally with amino acids. The research consists of one preliminary study that measured HGH levels. There is no clinical evidence that it is effective for anything.

/ November 26, 2019

Nurse Practitioner Pushes Dubious Aesthetic Treatments

Nurse practitioner aggressively advertises a plethora of aesthetic treatments, some of which are dubious. It's legal, but is it ethical?

/ November 19, 2019

Aging: Is It a Preventable Disease?

David Sinclair says aging is a disease that can be prevented and treated, and there is no reason life must end. The evidence he presents from scientific studies is intriguing, but far from definitive.

/ November 12, 2019

Tonaki Tinnitus Protocol

Todd Carson promises to cure tinnitus in 21 days with a 3-ingredient smoothie containing vegetables from Tonaki. Fanciful claim with not a shred of evidence. The webpage even admits it's fiction.

/ November 5, 2019

Lipo-Flavonoid for Tinnitus

Lipo-Flavonoid is sold to treat tinnitus. The claims are misleading, and the evidence isn't there.

/ October 29, 2019

“SuperMannan Cures Bladder Infections!” Really?

The ads claim SuperMannan cures bladder infections. The science is a single uncontrolled study of 9 women; its design is a recipe for disaster.

/ October 22, 2019

Australian Naturopath Barbara O’Neill Banned for Her Dangerous Health Advice

Naturopath Barbara O'Neill has been banned in Australia for spreading dangerous lies about health.

/ October 15, 2019

Hydrogen Water Is Not “the New Nutrient;” Health Claims Are Hype, Not Science.

A new fad, drinking hydrogen water, claims to provide all kinds of health benefits. The scientific evidence isn't there.

/ October 8, 2019