Chiropractor Marc LeRoy has a funny idea of what "closed" means.

Chiropractor Disregards the Loss of His License, Continues to Treat Patients with Cervical Dysplasia with Escharotics

A chiropractor who bills himself as a chiropractic gynecologist has continued to practice after his license was permanently revoked. Among his many questionable practices, Nick LeRoy is treating cervical dysplasia with escharotics, a potentially dangerous replacement for conventional treatments to prevent cancer.

/ October 17, 2017
Samueli College of Health Sciences rendering

Integrative medicine advocates react to criticisms of the Samuelis’ $200 million gift to UC-Irvine

Last month, Susan and Henry Samueli donated $200 million to the University of California, Irvine to promote integrative medicine. We were pleasantly surprised by the unflattering coverage in the press of the gift. We were unpleasantly unsurprised by the reaction of integrative medicine advocates to the criticism.

/ October 16, 2017
Magnesium_sulfate

Don’t drink your bath water – Epsom salts, liver damage, and naturopaths

What's the harm of naturopathy? How about Epsom salt-induced liver damage?

/ October 13, 2017
We  need to  eliminate quackery from our laws.

Repealing Legislative Alchemy

We need to repeal federal and state laws that allow quackery and pseudoscience in healthcare.

/ October 12, 2017
citations1

Zombie Science

Retractions of scientific studies do not always mean that the studies die a deserved death. Sometimes they live on as zombie studies, continuing to be cited by other researchers and having an effect on the scientific discussion. We can fix this.

/ October 11, 2017
tmp_2873-natural-medicine-1738161_1280-721778708

Preying on the Vulnerable: Electrodiagnostics, Bach Flower Remedies, and Sound Therapy for Autism, ADHD, and Learning Problems

Karyne Jeanne Richardson offers a ridiculous program of electrodiagnosis, flower remedies, and fractal sound to treat autism and other disorders. There are science-based autism programs that work; it is unfortunate when parents subject their autistic children to onerous, expensive, time-consuming, useless treatments based on pseudoscientific claims and false promises.

/ October 10, 2017
Dr. Andy Wakefield photographed at home in Austin, Texas. Wakefield is a physician best known for his controversial work on autism.  (Photo by David Howells/Corbis via Getty Images)

The Pathological Optimist: More hagiography than documentary about Andrew Wakefield

The Pathological Optimist is a recently released documentary by Miranda Bailey about Andrew Wakefield that I got a chance to see. In interviews and in the film's promotional materials, Bailey takes great pains to emphasize that she "doesn't take a side" about Wakefield. Unfortunately, her film demonstrates that, when it comes to pseudoscience, "not taking a side" is taking a side, and...

/ October 9, 2017
Acupuncture

Yet Another Miscellany of Medical Malarkey

Acupuncture for menstrual cramps, chiropractic for the prevention of domestic terrorism, and more in this miscellany of medical malarkey. Or would you prefer hodgepodge of healthcare hokum?

/ October 6, 2017
Cancer cell

Complementary and Alternative Medicines and Cancer

Does complementary and alternative medicine offer any meaningful benefits to cancer patients?

/ October 5, 2017
Emperor's new clothes

More Integrative Propaganda

Defenders of integrative quackery attack proponents of science-based medicine for simply pointing out the scientific evidence and exposing their poor logic.

/ October 4, 2017