Month: July 2009

Bibliography for my Talk at TAM 7: Why Evidence-Based Medicine is not yet Science-Based Medicine

As promised at the meeting. Let me know by comment if you think I left anything out.

/ July 11, 2009

Functional Medicine (FM) What Is It?

Functional Medicine – What is it? After extensive searching and examination, my answer is still – only the originators of “FM” know. Or, at least one must assume they know, because so far as I can see, I certainly see nothing that distinguishes “FM” from other descriptions of sectarian and “Complementary/Alternative Medicine” practices. A difference may lie in the advocates’ assumptions to...

/ July 9, 2009

Science-Based Medicine Conference

The Science-Based Medicine Conference has begun! Val is Twittering it at: http://twitter.com/drval Check it out at the tags #TAM7 and #SBM.

/ July 9, 2009

NIH Awards $30 Million Research Dollars To Convicted Felons: Cliff’s Notes Version

In case you’re coming late to this discussion (or have ADD), I’ve summarized Dr. Kimball Atwood’s terrific analysis of the ongoing clinical trial (TACT trial) in which convicted felons were awarded $30 million by the NIH. *** In one of the most unethical clinical trial debacles of our time, the NIH approved a research study (called the TACT Trial – Trial to...

/ July 9, 2009

The British Chiropractic Association Responds to Simon Singh

Simon Singh is a science journalist who last year wrote an article in the Guardian critical of the British Chiropractic Association (BCA) for promoting chiropractic treatment for certain childhood ailments. Singh characterized these treatments as “bogus” because they lack evidence to back up claims for clinical efficacy. The BCA responded by suing Singh for libel. In the English court system the person...

/ July 8, 2009

Healing Touch and Coronary Bypass

A study published in Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine is being cited as evidence for the efficacy of healing touch (HT). It enrolled 237 subjects who were scheduled for coronary bypass, randomized them to receive HT, a visitor, or no treatment; and found that HT was associated with a greater decrease in anxiety and shorter hospital stays. This study is a...

/ July 7, 2009

Does popularity lead to unreliability in scientific research?

One of the major themes here on the Science-Based Medicine (SBM) blog has been about one major shortcoming of the more commonly used evidence-based medicine paradigm (EBM) that has been in ascendance as the preferred method of evaluating clinical evidence. Specifically, as Kim Atwood (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8) has pointed out before, EBM values clinical studies above all...

/ July 6, 2009

Medical training versus scientific training

This month I will begin my third year of medical school, after a three-year break for laboratory research. Living alternately in the worlds of med school and grad school has prompted me to reflect on differences between these training programs. [Obvious disclaimer: I have studied at a single institution, and only for five years.] I am enrolled in a dual-degree MD/PhD program. About 120 US medical schools...

/ July 4, 2009

Homeopathic A & E

I love the British comedy duo Mitchell and Webb, and this is just one reason why. They totally get homeopathy, as this video e-mailed to me by a reader demonstrates: Pay close attention to the signs in the A & E. No doubt Dana Ullman will show up to cry foul over how Mitchell and Webb are totally “misrepresenting” homeopathy…

/ July 3, 2009

The Evil League of Evil is Nothing in Comparison

Transcribed minutes of a meeting, provenance unknown. Chairman: “I would like to call this emergency meeting to order and thank you all for coming under short notice.  If there are no objections, I will dispense with the usual formalities and get right to the business at hand.” Murmur of approval. Chairman: Ladies, Gentleman and Demons of all kinds, we have been, to...

/ July 3, 2009